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Careers

Jobs and Interships

Would you like to contribute to advancing medical research? Join one of our team. Here is the list of internships or career opportunities to be filled at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre. If no position listed below matches what you are looking for, do not hesitate to send a spontaneous application directly to the research team you would like to join in. 

Available Positions and Interships

Research Assistants, Laboratory Technicians and Paratechnical Personnel

Molecular Biologist in Vision Science / Cell Biology

Position

  • Salary: between 50 000 $ and 65 000 $

Department

Research Department
Centre de recherche HMR / Centre de recherche CHU Sainte-Justine

Job Summary

The laboratory of Dr. Sylvain Chemtob studies the mechanisms of prematurity and its consequences on the fetus and / or the newborn, especially in vision. Our studies have also expanded on new avenues for aging, including age-related macular degeneration. 

The laboratory is looking for a research associate who has expertise in molecular biology. More specifically, the candidate will be responsible for:

  • Conduct and carry out several projects in progress in the laboratory;
  • Participate actively in the activities of the lab meeting where he/she must present the research results and interact with other members of the team regarding the expected results and recommend preferred orientations;
  • Participate in writing articles with members of the research team as first author or co-author;
  • Supervision of students and / or trainees.
     

Starting Date

1st October 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

Post-doctorate Position

Post-Doctoral Fellow in Retinal and Choroidal Angiogenesis

Job Summary

Our laboratory focuses on characterizing novel molecules that modulate the growth of blood vessels in the eye, with the hope of establishing new therapeutic strategies to treat neovascular ocular pathologies. Indeed, diseases associated with inappropriate neovascularization, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), account for the most common causes of vision loss in the industrial world. AMD is characterized by choroidal blood vessel growth that can ultimately lead to retinal damage. Our lab tackles these diseases by studying choroidal and retinal angiogenesis and the factors that regulate it. Moreover, we are interested in the cellular interactions and signaling that regulate vessel growth in both physiological and pathological contexts.

Posting Date

June 2019

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Doctorate Position

Ph.D. in Asymetric Division and Biophotonics

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

We are looking for a motivated M.Sc. or Ph. D. student with background in molecular biology,
biomedical sciences or biomedical engineering interested to work on asymmetric division.
We recently developed a technology to labelling the membrane of live cell, a method termed Cell
Labeling via Photobleaching (CLaP). It allows arbitrary tagging of individual cells among a
heterogeneous population within a microscopy field. CLaP consists of crosslinking biotin to the
plasma membrane of chosen cells with the lasers of a confocal microscope, followed by use of
fluorescent streptavidin conjugates to reveal the tagged cells. In this manner, the same
instrument used for imaging can be adapted to label particular cells based exclusively on any
visible trait that distinguishes them from the ensemble. The mark is stable, non-toxic, retained in
cells for several days, and does not produce detectable alterations in cell morphology, viability,
or proliferative capacity. Moreover, genome-wide transcriptomic profiling demonstrated no
major changes in gene expression associated with the procedure. We aim to apply this method
to study genetic mechanism governing asymmetric division.

Posting Date

May 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

Ph.D. in OCT and Biophotonics

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

During radiotherapy, ionizing radiation (IR) efficiently kills cancer cells by directly inducing highlygenotoxic DNA double strand breaks (DSB). The efficiencies of DSB are critical determinants in the response to cancer radiotherapy; indeed substantial evidence indicates that enhanced DSBR capacity in individual patients is a major determinant in tumour radioresistance. Moreover, (i) the considerable number of patients displaying severe radiosensitivity, who suffer from extreme IR-induced destruction of healthy tissue, and (ii) the occurrence of radiotherapy-induced secondary cancers, are both presumably associated with reduced DSBR capacity. In view of the above, there is a pressing need to better understand the fundamental mechanisms of DSBR, towards improving the clinical management of patients undergoing radiotherapy. Following exposure of cells to IR, multiple DNA repair proteins are rapidly recruited to DSB sites, forming nuclear foci which can only be monitored visually by fluorescence microscopy. Importantly, abnormal persistence (slow resolution) of foci is a well-established indicator of defective DSBR in general. Isolation and subsequent characterization of single cells based on their ability to resolve IRinduced nuclear foci has never been accomplished. To address this, we recently developed a method termed Single-Cell Magneto-Optical Capture (scMOCa) that allows, for the first time, arbitrary tagging of individual cells among a heterogeneous population within a microscopy field and their subsequent isolation and clonal expansion. By targeting individual live cells from within a heterogeneous population exhibiting differential capacity to resolve IR-induced DNA repair foci, we will set the stage for genome-wide profiling and functional analyses on the resulting clonallyderived cell populations.

Posting Date

May 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

Ph.D. in Double-Strand Break Repar and Biophotonics 

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

We are looking for a motivated M.Sc. or Ph. D. student with background in molecular biology,
biomedical sciences or biomedical engineering interested to work on asymmetric division.
We recently developed a technology to labelling the membrane of live cell, a method termed Cell
Labeling via Photobleaching (CLaP). It allows arbitrary tagging of individual cells among a
heterogeneous population within a microscopy field. CLaP consists of crosslinking biotin to the
plasma membrane of chosen cells with the lasers of a confocal microscope, followed by use of
fluorescent streptavidin conjugates to reveal the tagged cells. In this manner, the same
instrument used for imaging can be adapted to label particular cells based exclusively on any
visible trait that distinguishes them from the ensemble. The mark is stable, non-toxic, retained in
cells for several days, and does not produce detectable alterations in cell morphology, viability,
or proliferative capacity. Moreover, genome-wide transcriptomic profiling demonstrated no
major changes in gene expression associated with the procedure. We aim to apply this method
to study genetic mechanism governing asymmetric division.

Posting Date

May 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

Ph.D. in Translational Nanophotonics, Drug Delivery and Biomaterials

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

We have positions available immediately for 1-2 motivated students to undertake an interdisciplinary, clinical translation project in ophthalmology/neurosciences.

Briefly, neurological pain and inflammation are involved in many pathological conditions for which treatment faces clinical challenges. Here, we will be using nanophotonics-enabled drug delivery to effectively modulate inflammation and relieve pain in several disease models, including severe viral infection. Our approach uses a combination of biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, molecular and cell biology techniques to enable targeted drug delivery.

This is a collaborative project. Students should expect exposure to several different areas and will be able to develop in-depth expertise in at least two areas. Areas to be covered in the collaborative effort include biomaterials/nanomaterial design and fabrication, cell culture (specifically neurons), gene transfer, viral cultures, advanced microscopy, and animal models. The student will join the laboratories of Prof. Boutopoulos and Prof. Griffith at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center (CR-HMR) and the laboratory of Prof. Talbot at UdeM.

Posting Date

July 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

Master Position

M.Sc. in Asymetric Division and Biophotonics

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

We are looking for a motivated M.Sc. or Ph. D. student with background in molecular biology,
biomedical sciences or biomedical engineering interested to work on asymmetric division.
We recently developed a technology to labelling the membrane of live cell, a method termed Cell
Labeling via Photobleaching (CLaP). It allows arbitrary tagging of individual cells among a
heterogeneous population within a microscopy field. CLaP consists of crosslinking biotin to the
plasma membrane of chosen cells with the lasers of a confocal microscope, followed by use of
fluorescent streptavidin conjugates to reveal the tagged cells. In this manner, the same
instrument used for imaging can be adapted to label particular cells based exclusively on any
visible trait that distinguishes them from the ensemble. The mark is stable, non-toxic, retained in
cells for several days, and does not produce detectable alterations in cell morphology, viability,
or proliferative capacity. Moreover, genome-wide transcriptomic profiling demonstrated no
major changes in gene expression associated with the procedure. We aim to apply this method
to study genetic mechanism governing asymmetric division.

Posting Date

May 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

M.Sc. in OCT and Biophotonics

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

During radiotherapy, ionizing radiation (IR) efficiently kills cancer cells by directly inducing highlygenotoxic DNA double strand breaks (DSB). The efficiencies of DSB are critical determinants in the response to cancer radiotherapy; indeed substantial evidence indicates that enhanced DSBR capacity in individual patients is a major determinant in tumour radioresistance. Moreover, (i) the considerable number of patients displaying severe radiosensitivity, who suffer from extreme IR-induced destruction of healthy tissue, and (ii) the occurrence of radiotherapy-induced secondary cancers, are both presumably associated with reduced DSBR capacity. In view of the above, there is a pressing need to better understand the fundamental mechanisms of DSBR, towards improving the clinical management of patients undergoing radiotherapy. Following exposure of cells to IR, multiple DNA repair proteins are rapidly recruited to DSB sites, forming nuclear foci which can only be monitored visually by fluorescence microscopy. Importantly, abnormal persistence (slow resolution) of foci is a well-established indicator of defective DSBR in general. Isolation and subsequent characterization of single cells based on their ability to resolve IRinduced nuclear foci has never been accomplished. To address this, we recently developed a method termed Single-Cell Magneto-Optical Capture (scMOCa) that allows, for the first time, arbitrary tagging of individual cells among a heterogeneous population within a microscopy field and their subsequent isolation and clonal expansion. By targeting individual live cells from within a heterogeneous population exhibiting differential capacity to resolve IR-induced DNA repair foci, we will set the stage for genome-wide profiling and functional analyses on the resulting clonallyderived cell populations.

Posting Date

May 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

M.Sc. in Double-Strand Break Repar and Biophotonics

Position

  • Full time

Department

Research Department

Job Summary

We are looking for a motivated M.Sc. or Ph. D. student with background in molecular biology,
biomedical sciences or biomedical engineering interested to work on asymmetric division.
We recently developed a technology to labelling the membrane of live cell, a method termed Cell
Labeling via Photobleaching (CLaP). It allows arbitrary tagging of individual cells among a
heterogeneous population within a microscopy field. CLaP consists of crosslinking biotin to the
plasma membrane of chosen cells with the lasers of a confocal microscope, followed by use of
fluorescent streptavidin conjugates to reveal the tagged cells. In this manner, the same
instrument used for imaging can be adapted to label particular cells based exclusively on any
visible trait that distinguishes them from the ensemble. The mark is stable, non-toxic, retained in
cells for several days, and does not produce detectable alterations in cell morphology, viability,
or proliferative capacity. Moreover, genome-wide transcriptomic profiling demonstrated no
major changes in gene expression associated with the procedure. We aim to apply this method
to study genetic mechanism governing asymmetric division.

Posting Date

May 2019

Find Out More

See the full offer

 

Spontaneous Applicants

The Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre is always looking for students and doctorands to expand its research teams. If the internships or career opportunities listed above do not correspond to your interest or experience, please consult the list of our research investigators and their research areas. Identify the research team you would like to join. Send your application directly to them. Do not forget to include the following items:

  • Your resume
  • A cover letter that includes your long-term research goals and your key accomplishments.